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Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)
you indicate that the unemployment rate, in his current environment, with 6.7% -- with longer unemployment, is not like 6.6% unemployment in normal times? >> but mike, how do you communicate that? >> it will be difficult to do that and you will have speeches you make to give people guidance on what is going forward. i want to ask about the statement of inflation not being a problem. betting that inflation will rise over the coming months and the question is, how much is slack is there. on bloomberg surveillance tomorrow -- they argued it -- he will argue, this is much more dangerous than people think. saywill see chairman yellen that they will follow strict policy that will look at the labor market for reasons that we mentioned but this is not the only thing they will look at. they will go day to day to make sure they are not too soft. >> what kind of market can ben bernanke handoff to janet yellen? >> i would much rather be in her spot than his spot in 2008. i think that ben bernanke did a wonderful job of communicating that we are moving to tapering, and handing chairperson
environment we heard about how a lot of the coverage around elections wasn't particularly polarized. there are undoubtedly concerns around the future of where this is going to be. fragile my work is on states in general. fragile states tend to be fractured state. and we are seeing an increase in the fragmented and fractured media in afghanistan and the most fractured part of that getting quiteably significant injections of funding at the moment. if the last length -- it is the that isng for a state trying to chart its own national identity -- it is not necessarily a useful way of going. but as the media -- but the media is becoming ever more fractured and fragile. >> how solid do you think is the support that you expect to see in terms ofection governmental support for the concept of a free media? i know there was discussion recently about freedom of the press in afghanistan. >> again, when you compare it to other countries, afghanistan has had a remarkable -- has managed to create a remarkable space of freedom of media. this is because -- we should give credit to president karzai .
the internet as we travel around in the mobile environment. it is critical. nothing works without the internet. they are still transitioning us from voice services or sms on plans. >> on the internet, what is happening with companies like facebook and whatsapp is that people are specializing. whatsapp took what people are doing and specializing to only doing messaging. nothing goes badly. carriers specialize in delivering ip quickly for voice and video services. they start doing fewer things, but doing them better. that is the trend. >> if i were a european carrier, i would say something is going badly when voxer gets all of my customers voice calls and texting and whatsapp -- >> even the carriers would agree with that. >> we are providing more services than before. we provide reliable message delivery, voice and video services, photo and video sending. what you are getting is the data plan. it is a $100 million company. they want the good parts. they want the good parts about the bad parts. that is not a reasonable way to analyze the trade-off. >> what do you think of mark zuckerberg's idea o
. this is what the environment secretary said, and i quote, people get very emotional about this. people should just accept the climate has been changing for century. he refuses to be briefed on climate change. the energy minister when asked about climate change said this -- you're not going to draw me on that. i haven't had time to get into the climate change debate. [laughter] he is the energy minister, mr. speaker. will he clarify? is a habit of climate change deniers in this government? >> this is a new approach to prime minister's questions. you come to the house of commons and praise the prime minister for his commitment to climate change. [shouting] i like the new style but i thought -- i think this is much more refreshing. this government has a solid track record of cutting carbon, negotiating internationally, to of investing in nuclear, the biggest renewable energy program that we've seen in our countries history. for the first time in a long, we are on track to meet up renewable target. perhaps he would like to get up again and congratulate me for this excellent record on the environm
and blind development. we must strengthen the economic environment and resolve to take forceful measures to complete this challenging task. >> now, we heard the announcements from before and there are many people who are worried about whether or not the government at the end of the day is really going to be willing to sacrifice growth in order to try to push through some of these reforms and address some of on these issues, not only on pollution, but also on debt. in terms of pollution, people are saying that if you really want to shut down a lot of these factory webs you could end up with a lot of workers who don't have any place to go. that is one of the main concerns that could actually leave some questions in people's minds as to whether or not the government will be able to push ahead and make these changes, julia. >> thank you. and if i also noticed a 12.5% rise in their defense budget, too. we've seen expressions of concern before the japanese, which is perhaps surprising. is that a waste of money? what's the feedback been on that rise? i know it's something they seem to do everyt
things out of your environment. that is how you solve problems. john: in terms of people test -- testing, is this better? this is what people did. >> they are reading about the world. so. >> i am wearing orange socks. aren't they cool? john: not all. >> not talking about the story next key. a few. talking about what they had for dinner and what the best tacos are. john: any chance that you are a grouchy old man. >> i was a grungy old man -- was a grouchy teenager, and reggie young adults, and alabama grouchy -- i would not say hamel your old. i'm not old. i like what they create. facebook is a wonderful thing. if you can control it. john: you're going beyond that. cyberspace addiction, an epidemic is leading to a weaker america. >> true. no doubt in my mind. john: socrates, old people have always complained about young people of people -- >> old people are smarter than young people. socrates said that and right after that he drank hemlock and died. so depressed that he killed himself. john: in this case the young people may be smarter than me, and we will find out. >> smarter than you, b
environment requires us to requirementize and make difficult choices. some we must make now. >> despite the problems and the cost overruns, the military has no plans to scrap the f35. russia and china are developing fighters that will outgun and outfly the u.s. fleet. the question is whether the pentagon can make good on the promise of a jet that can tackle all threats in all conditions. >> the budget proposal calls for retiring the u2 spy plan for one controlled remotely. >> a pregnant woman apparently drove into the water, driving a minnie van with her three children, ages 10, 9 and 3. life guards and other beach goers rushed in. they pulled all for to safety before the van was submerged by the waves. one of the children told rescue areas, "mummy is trying to kill us, please help." the mother was incoherent, uncooperative. she is undergoing psychiatric evaluation, the children have been placed in protective custody. >> tex joons have gone to the polls. greg abbott peat out eight other candidates, facing off against wendy davis. she is the first female nom ni since ann richards in 1994
or the environment. that is an important point to be made. that is the argument being used against keystone. host: he also asked you about unemployment insurance. guest: i am open to that. we offered a bill that we would be really -- we would be willing to support. we put forward alternatives that i have supported and republicans would support. we have to make sure that as we passed legislation we are addressing the deficit and the debt. a 17.2 trillion dollar debt. we have to address that for future generations. to a caller from alaska, anchorage, alaska. patrick, republican line. you are on was senator hoven. caller: good morning. thank you for the washington journal. it is a very valuable resource for us. senator hoven, i have two questions. because of the previous caller, i wanted to clarify one point regarding private and public oil out of alaska. governor hickle saw to it that we became an owner states. much closer to that oil being private oil than it is public. the oil companies appear are telling us that the reason there is only 500,000 barrels a day going down the pipe is because structure
at morgan stanley is still bullish, saying look, in this type of environment it's all about growth, even though you do have some big valuations in certain sectors within tech. that's where the growth is and that's where you see investors going and particularly on a day like today, they are flocking towards a tech-heavy nasdaq index. >> understandably so. thanks, sheila. appreciate it very much. >>> the dow is having its best day of the year. we are up almost 218 points on the trading session. now bob pisani is here. it's lifting almost all boats today. >> that's right. earlier today it was ten to one advancing to declining stocks. relief rally's a good way to describe this given what happened yesterday and the strength of the rally. midcap, historic high. small cap, russell 2000 at an historic high. the volatility in the vix, remember yesterday it went from 14 to 16? it went back down to 14 today, indication that tensions are easing. we don't know why. it was always unclear what the military action would be. it seems very clear we don't know what's going to happen but tanks are not going
environment, and i would hope that everyone understand that it is all about order. and if we don't have order, we cannot provide programs. we're constantly looking down institutions. since the hearing in 2012, we have restricted housing population reduction by 25 perce percent. we have gone from 13.5 percent to 6.5 percent. so reductions are occurring. we are only interested in placing people in restrictive housing when there is justification. we have 20,000 gang members in our system. they are watching this hearing. they are watching our testimony very, very closely for the reason being if they see we will lower standards and not hold the individuals accountable, it puts the staff and inmates at risk. and this is why i mentioned in my oral statement, we are looking at staff being injured and harmed but our staff is putting their lives on the line to protect the american public. and we have inmates within the population who are being harmed by these individuals who have no respect, i mean no respect for other's when it comes to their safety. we cannot afford, at any time, to say that for thos
, get used to just the environment of television. and i think it will -- he'll settle down -- i think he settled down a little bit by friday. >> but he's 25 and has blue eyes. what more kooupt? >> exactly. >> and by the way, joe, he had no previous journalistic experience. after three days on the air, he won a coveted cronkite award. >> it must be the nobel people giving out that award. i feel sorry for ronan farrow. "new york times," entertainment weekly, but from msnbc president phil griffin who said i met this kid for 20 minutes and i knew he had it and he should have his own perform. he had the lowest rated show on all of msnbc on monday and thol those ratings dropped throughout the week. what i would have done is put him on a show like the cycle, an opinion show, not as much heavy lifting for a co-host and give him his training wheels until you give him his own show for one hour which he's not done any broadcasting, local, community access or especially national. >> it's tough to be thrown into that chair. finally, msnbc let alec baldwin go a while back. he has cover story in "new y
was saying, i want to be fair to the russian people consuming this in that controlled news environment, we're not saying that if you're buying the putin view of this, you know, that that's just -- you're just being dumb. i mean, there's a lot of ways in which he presents this that can sound reasonable if you hear nothing else. >> absolutely. and this has been one of the most amazing things of the putin project since he's come to power. he's created this kind of alternate reality. at first he did it domestically. when you're in russia, it's incredibly. the talk of democracy, the posters on the streets, the people out at also ryes, the lines at election booths. these are things that the kremlin orchestrates very, very carefully. this is the first time he's moved beyond his borders to do it there. so this is a very controlled campaign. it's a theatre. >> james welcome back to the show. thanks for joining us again. >>> coming up, vladimir putin's political machine. and later, breaking news from texas. wendy davis has become the first woman since anne richards to win a primary for governor of t
on the environment beyond the end of this term. it's an interesting read. >> fossil fuels, they don't like them. by the way, china in their new five five-year plan, thank you, mao, is talking about environmental cleaner. that's instrumental. you got to be able to gauge the ability to be able to see your feet in the smog there. and i know that that's where the real issues are for global warming. obviously they take our jobs. they do a lot of global warming. but we're worried about keystone. in the meantime the trucks and the trains are going to take it all. they are terrible ways. trains don't use that much pollution, but understand that when warren buffett said it's better, a big pipeline cop,mpany, but burlington northern will be the primary beneficiary so i thought he was unconflicted and also unqualified. >> very nice. down is down 27 or 29 points let's get to bob pisani on the floor. good morning. >> good morning. we started in positive territory on the s&p but we just turned negative and, of course, we were at historic highs not just there but the midcap and small cap in
to foster job growth and promote a greener and cleaner environment for the next generation. the p.t.c., production tax credit, also creates jobs. in my district, the capital region of new york state, we are host to g.e.'s global research center and wind turbines service septre. in 2012 alone, g.e.'s wind division produced some 1,722 megawatts of power and provided a local capital investment of some $3.2 billion. if we are serious about helping the private sector create quality jobs that will put purchasing power back in the hands of the middle class, we must support wind power as one part of our overall energy policy and strategy. madam speaker, today i renew my support for wind power and the almost 2,000 jobs this clean energy source generates in my home state of new york. a number that is growing by the day, and a group whose work every day is helping to grow our economy, clean the air we breathe, and the water we drink, and make us truly energy independent. with that i thank you, madam speaker, and i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. the chair reco
office environment, like we have here. that is compared to 27% for men. >> do you have an open office? >> yes, completely open. >> and conference rooms are always occupied? >> yes, they are on the interior. people are all around in an open area layout. when people need to meet, they find a conference room. >> you are moving right now. as a businessman, as a new york guy, how do you feel about you moving to the empire state? >> it is a great building. we were looking for 80,000 square feet. options, not too many -- we found maybe four or five at the time. we have two floors, 20 and 21. internal staircase. >> did you have to redo a lot of the truck sure where you are now? >> there were lots of small tenants, and i think they move them around. >> it is not available yet, but would you have considered the new world trade center? >> we did look at it. i think you can still. you cannot move in yet, but you can to some stuff in advance. it is actually pretty expensive. when we compared it to some of the other pricing -- >> for a tech company like yours, they have retrofitted the building. ev
of the operating environment, the cultural differences and, of course, the native language capability. we do not believe the special operations variant of the chin yearbook would have fared any differently than extortion 17 on that night. there is no techniadvantage inherent in the special operations model that would have protected it from the rocket that downed the aircraft. we recognize, however, that these helicopters are vulnerable to regrenades. although there's currently no proven system to counter that particular weapon and that particular enemy tactic in the two and a half years since this tragic loss, we have fielded 24 different survivability and safety equipment upgrades on over 2,000 of our military aircraft. with the chinook ch-47 receiving as many as four of these individual up grades, and we continue our efforts, with the support of congress, to fund the research and development to develop the countermeasures that we would need to protect against the rpg. but i have to say no chances in technology or any change in the way we operate will bring back our fallen heros or's the pa
, the gist of it is the keystone pipeline effect would have very little impact on the environment. but yet they have still come out saying this report was bias. saying it was handled properly and sometimes was more rigorous than required. this thing hands down, it will certainly get built. stuart: very strict. >> you don't want it shipped. which would be ridiculous. stuart: it would be ridiculous. come on, charles. charles: build it and you can export it. stuart: you say he will do that. charles: i think so. stuart: senator harry reid calling the horror stories untrue. not so fast, listen to the senator on the senate floor yesterday. >> she works, she has maintained a number of part-time jobs, has a masters degree and then she says once it was passed, she said i saw the writing on the wall and so did the companies i work for. stuart: the senator joins us now from capitol hill. we just ran a clip from what you are saying on the show yesterday. in the constituent hurt economically and i take it you object to calling her a liar. correct? >> absolutely. he cannot handle the truth. we have been
the prosupposed keystone oil pipeline. claiming it would damage the environment. nearly 400 people were arrested in the protest. >>> and finally, one of the great golf shots you will ever see. it came on the 18th hole in a playoff round in a women's tournament in singapore. take a look. everything on the line for paula creamer facing a virtually impossible 70-foot putt. look at that ball, trickle down, and then break about a foot right to left. tracing an arc into the cup. go crazy, paula. go crazy. >> she can't believe it. >> she can't believe it, no way. >> did i do that? >> her first title in four years. she says she could probably stand there again all day long and not come within six feet of the hole. a wonderful moment. >> that is so great. >>> the weather not so great for many people. >> you know, and it was so bad here. guess what, by next weekend here it will be 80 and nice. just to let you know. a special place to show you my weather. come on over with me. give you an idea of what's happened. the wind chill 12 below in chicago. 9 below in st. louis and 3 below pittsburgh. a real quick
at the entrance of the store. they make it a shopping environment. we know you love tesla. tesla is going down. the stock is up today. does he mean, or she, do they mean that the stock will go down? >> i do not have a comment on it. whether it will have a powerful battery to lower the cost of the model. can they make a battery? solar city. tesla invented a battery. who knows. local, chapultepec, a new high, i believe. nicole: the shareholders love to see it. it hit 579. up about 4%. just recently hit another high. do not forget, now they are offering shredded tofu. stuart: who saw $500 a share? nicole: a mcdonald's spinoff. you remember when. stuart: take a look at radioshack. the company is closing 1100 stores. now they have announced they are closing 1100 stores. is this a possible turnaround? liz: i do not think so. we have been talking about radioshack for years. i think the cost is way too much. stuart: the last comment from you. >> you go for doctors. stuart: welcome back, tracy. we thank everybody for participating. thank you. an attorney for lois lerner says she will only testify under
to do to try to stabilize an environment that has become dangerous in many respects. we will have a chance talk about , a country that is of critical importance, where we have the opportunity, i think i might to move beyond recent over several west years and there is a path to transition within egypt. to security asnt well as u.s. security. we will talk about iraqi and my absolutely -- my absolute to makee -- commitment sure that it ran does not have a nuclear weapon. can potentially lead to a solution that ensures that iran is not developing a nuclear weapon. we will spend time talking about the prospect of peace between israelis and palestinians. i want to commend publicly the efforts that prime minister netanyahu have made and very link the and painstaking negotiations with my secretary of state, john kerry. are tough negotiations. the issues are profound. the reason that they would have been resolved years ago but prime minister netanyahu has approached these negotiations with a level of seriousness and commitment that reflect his leadership and the desire for the israeli peop
to this. in future environments, ciber will be the first tool used. >> by both sides? >> by both sides. host: we are joined by paul mcleary a you are watching the exchange at the senate armed services committee earlier this week. the united states, it there's not much dispute that the u.s. has the best conventional military force in the world but how do our cyber capability stack up against other countries? guest: it's hard to measure. the chinese have put a lot of money into this and they have a lot of resources and assets directed toward this but their budget is not public like ours. you don't know exactly what they are doing. what general alexander was saying cuts to the heart of the matter. mightwar, whatever that be, offense or defense of, there is no manual for it. it is a whole new world, a new form of warfare. how do you conduct it, what does it mean, when would this lead to more conventional operations and how do u.s. collate or de-escalate and how do you make that a determined factor to prevent future conflicts? host: if you want to talk about these subjects or have a questio
. we can come back tomorrrow. and we promise to keep it that way. driven to preserve the environment, csx moves a ton of freight nearly 450 miles on one gallon of fuel. what a day. can't wait til tomorrow. ♪ >>> you talked about the nasdaq being up big and this is one of the reasons. take a stock like omni vision technologies and they reported that a number of people didn't expect anything good because people thought they would lose apple business and china business, but it was much better than expected. they are looking for trading cash, and sound like yahoo!? it is a major change. and now what has been red hot is biotech. medivation, they ahave a cancer drug, and they say they will accelerate, but it is not. and the jaws are dropping on the analysts who were bull ish, and keep in mind that where you have moves in biotech where everything is up, and up, and up, and everything must be perfect, and when they are not, the stocks get hammered. >> and how do you guide people through that morass, the biotech morass and who is going to win and lose? >> well, you fry to have companies who
an environment, rapid inflation either. if you look at measures of the labor market, which it's getting harder to gauge as unemployment rate comes down, there are signs of under utilization, marriagely attached whatters, part time for economic reasons and that represents hidden slack in the labor market, and it will keep down pressure on overall core inflation. >> the last two jobs reports were disappointing, hard to predict. how do you go about making a model for friday's job number? >> it is not easy because trying to put weather variables in models have been frustrating. our baseline forecast is below consensus, we're at 115,000. we tended to focus a lot on the weather conditions during this survey week and they were poor, with a snowstorm that hit the east coast, particularly the southeast had a big shutdown in activity. we think that will result in weakness in the headline number. but as you suggest, there's a big rhyme for air flr this month's payroll number. >> 150, looks like consensus. >> they're the low on the street, aren't you? 115 are you at, that is right? >> we're not the low bu
Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)